The Yellow Palm Frond as an Instrument for Restructuring and Resource Control in Ogba Culture: Imperatives for the Nigerian Project

  • Obodoegbulam Agi-Otto, PhD Ignatius Ajuru University of Education
Keywords: Ogba Culture, Yellow Palm Front, Restructuring, Resource Control, Nigeria

Abstract

In Ogba culture, most properties are held as a common estate. Though, by dint of hard work, individuals and groups may acquire personal property through purchase or bequest. Among the people, there is a distinction between mine, ours and theirs. Similarly, there is a strict distinction in explaining concepts such as for me, for them and for us. On this premise, individuals, groups and the wider society feel morally bound and might be ready to go to any length to protect what is theirs. This paper examines the Ogba concept of restructuring and resource control. The study identifies and explains the yellow palm frond as one of the instruments used to agitate for and secure resource control in Ogba culture. The paper observed that at any scene where the palm frond is used, deeper meanings and explanations are insinuated. The purpose of this study was to identify, explain and interpret the yellow palm front as an instrument for resource control in Ogba culture. The paper employed the ethnographic approach in the discussion. The research observes that Ogba people scrupulously apply the yellow palm frond to achieve restructuring and resource control in society. The study concluded that this practice of resource control and restructuring could be of benefit to the Nigerian project if adopted and applied.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

References

Achebe, C. (2012). There was a country: A memoir. Penguin.

Da’Wariboko, R. M. C. & Obodoegbulam, A. O. (2017). Succession and inheritance: an analysis of property rights in Ogba and Kalabari: Historical Perspective. In Festschrift in honour of Prof. E.S. Akama. Port Harcourt: Chadik Printing Press

Ekekwe. (2013). The limits of Ethnic Model of Niger Delta’s Underdevelopment” (Alabo Dereefaka Eds). Journal of Niger Delta studies. Port Harcourt, institute of Niger Delta Studies.

Ellah, F. J. (1995). Ali-Ogba: A History of Ogba People. Fourth Dimension Press.

Ezeani, E. (2014). In Biafra Africa Died: the diplomatic plot. Veritas Lumen Publishers.

Forsyth, F. (1977). The Making of Africa Legend. Great Britain: Chaucer Press.

Nkwede, J. O. (2015). Religion, Politics and Paradox of National Integration in Nigeria. In Anyanwu & Nwanaju (Eds), Religious conflicts and dialogue initiatives in Nigeria. Abakaliki: Citizens Advocate Press.

Obari, G. (2013). Where Postcolonial is Colonial: Oil Conflict in the Niger Delta” Journal of Niger Delta studies. Port Harcourt, institute of Niger Delta Studies.

Obodoegbulam A. O. (2019). Ogba Religion, the Pre-Christian Heritage. Pearl Publishers International Ltd.

Obodoegbulam, A. O. (2015). Religious Exclusivism: The memory of a fraudulent unity in Nigeria. In Anyanwu & Nwanaju (Eds), Religious conflicts and dialogue initiatives in Nigeria. Abakaliki: Citizens Advocate Press.

Obodoegbulam, A. O. (2019). Inheritance Custom in Ogba: A Legacy for Posterity. In Ogba land in socio-cultural Perspectives. Pearl Publishers International Ltd.

Obowu, V. O. (1972). Fundamental customs of Ogba people. Port Harcourt: Goodwill Press

Shebbs, E. U. & Njoku, R. (2016). Resource control in Nigeria-issues of politics, conflict and legality as a challenge to development of the Niger Delta region. Journal of Good Governance and Sustainable Development in Africa (JGGSDA), 3(3).

Tamuno, T. N. (2013). Local, National & Global Impact of Oil on Niger Delta History since 1870 (Lectures delivered at the Institute of Niger Delta Studies, Uniport). Journal of Niger Delta studies. Port Harcourt, institute of Niger Delta Studies.

Williams, M. (1986). Power & Authority. In Society Today (pp. 134-138). Palgrave, London.

Published
11 May, 2020
How to Cite
Agi-Otto, O. (2020). The Yellow Palm Frond as an Instrument for Restructuring and Resource Control in Ogba Culture: Imperatives for the Nigerian Project. East African Journal of Arts and Social Sciences, 2(1), 15-20. https://doi.org/10.37284/eajass.2.1.150